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Inflamm-Aging

Inflamm-Aging
January 18, 2018 Dr. Patrick Nemechek and Jean Nemechek

Inflamm-AgingAging is associated with low-grade chronic inflammatory state referred to “inflamm-ageing” or inflammaging.

 

Inflammaging is abnormal and unhealthy. It is associated with a chronically increased level of inflammatory chemicals within the blood stream called cytokines, and looks as if there is a chronic infection within the body but none exists.

Inflammaging accompanies virtually all aging related disorders (cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, degenerative arthritis, etc.), and the concentration of blood markers of inflammation (CRP and IL-6) positively correlate with the risk of developing these conditions over time.

Inflammaging is not just a phenomenon that accompanies the onset of these disorders, it is believed to be the primary process that is responsible for triggering them. In other words, without inflammaging people would not develop these conditions as they age.

Inflammation has various forms that can be both helpful and harmful, and may be regulated or unregulated. Determining what form of inflammation is going on in a person’s body depends upon the context of the situation.

Inflammation is a normal healthy response required to repair tissue or fight infection, and is regulated within the body in a process known as homeostasis. Homeostasis keeps the inflammatory system in balance but in many people the balance is being disrupted by environmental factors.

For example, a healthy increase in inflammation occurs for a short period of time after an individual sprains their ankle. The inflammation is a healthy response that is required to repair the damaged tissue, and once repaired the inflammation subsides. But if the inflammation persists after the injury is healed, the once healthy inflammatory response now becomes harmful.

Chronic inflammation has the ability to inappropriately activate genes within our DNA. The genes for potential illnesses (cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, etc.) we acquire from our parents at birth will remain dormant and harmless unless activated by inflammation.

 

Inflammation and Cancer

Most people do not realize that chronic inflammation and cancer go hand-in-hand, for example. The older we get, the more inflammation develops in our body, the greater the risk of developing cancer.

Ninety percent of all cancers are felt to be the consequence of inflammaging, and this even includes skin cancer which is commonly believed to occur from the sun. But the sun’s radiation only creates a genetic mutation for cancer which is harmless unless the mutated gene is activated by inflammation.

Breast cancer is another example for the strong connection between inflammation and malignancy. High levels of inflammation (as measured by the cytokine IL-6) correlates not only increases the risk of development of breast cancer but also increases the risk of progression and metastasis, decreases the response to therapy, and correlates with a poor prognosis.

The inflammation accompanying aging is the single most significant risk factor for cancer development, with the majority of cancer cases being diagnosed after the age of 65. There is a dramatic increase in the development of invasive breast, prostate, lung and colorectal cancer (3.5, 36, 28 and 12-fold increase respectively) after the age 70 compared to before the age of 50.

Alterations in our food supply, exposure to medical therapies, and other environmental factors are believed to be major sources of the inflammaging that fuels the risk of cancer as well as other age-associated disorders.

 

Sources of Inflammation

One important source of inflammation occurred with the industrialization of the global food supply. Eating grain-fed meat (corn-fed beef and pork, farm-raised fish) and the wide use of vegetable oils (soy/soybean, corn, safflower and sunflower oils) have resulted in an inflammation-producing imbalance of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in our diets.

The grains involved in feeding livestock and producing these oils contain large amounts of omega-6 fatty acids which are highly pro-inflammatory. At the same time our intake of omega-6 fatty acids have increased, our intake of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids have declined.

Diets with high amounts of saturated fatty acids such as palmitic acid (common in processed foods) are also associated with obesity, cardiovascular disease, and inflammaging. To make matters worse, the excessive adipose tissue that accumulates with obesity also is an additional source of the chronic inflammation.

The imbalance of omega fatty acids and increase in saturated fatty acids are common in the diet of most people worldwide and are felt by many experts to be the major trigger of global obesity and diabetes due to their inflammation-promoting characteristics.

The food supply additionally produces inflammation from the use of high temperatures in industrial, retail, and at-home cooking. High temperatures result in the creation of abnormal inflammatory molecules known as advanced glycation end products or AGE’s. Ingestion of AGE’s is linked to chronic inflammation and the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, cataracts, and hearing loss.

A major and common source of inflammation is the disruption of bacteria within the intestinal tract that can also contribute to inflammaging. The presence of pesticides, herbicides and preservatives in the food supply over many decades, as well as the use of common broad-spectrum antibiotics, have resulted the extinction of an estimated 15-30% of different bacterial species within the human intestinal tract.

The extinction of intestinal bacteria species as well as an imbalance of intestine bacteria (a condition called small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or SIBO) further worsens inflammaging through a variety of mechanisms (bacterial translocation, altered parasympathetic Autonomic Nervous System function, altered immune system homeostasis).

Medical interventions such as the prescription of potent antacids and antibiotics, colonoscopies, abdominal surgery, vaccinations, and general anesthesia are thought to increase the likelihood of developing inflammaging from SIBO.

 

The Cumulative Sources of Inflammation

Many Americans are affected by the combined inflammatory effects of all of these factors. Our inflammaging rises out of the foods we eat, our unbalanced intestinal bacteria, the excessive abdominal fat we have added over the years, and many of the medical procedures we have had to undergo or that we have elected to undergo.

And it all adds up. The variety of things we have done as a civilization to improve and prolong life have inadvertently triggered the chronic inflammatory process responsible for triggering illnesses associated with aging, and possibly with the recent declines in longevity noted in men within the U.S.

Advances in agricultural, food production, and medicine have greatly lessened the risk death from starvation and disease but they have had the unintended consequence of inflammaging. In spite all of our technological advances, we are getting sick faster and at much younger ages.

Fortunately, much can be done to lessen inflammaging and the risk of developing the diseases of aging such as cancer. This is where we begin to make the kitchen more powerful than the operating room and we begin by altering our omega fatty acids back into a chemically healthier ratio that lessens our inflammation.

People can start by reading food labels and eliminating excessive omega-6 vegetable oils (soy/soybean, corn, safflower and sunflower oils), shortening, and margarine from their diet.

People also can supplement their diet with a broad array of omega-3 fatty acids such as the EPA and DHA component most easily found in fish oil, and the ALA component that is found in nuts, flax, or ground chia seeds.

To help block and reverse the negative effects of omega-6 that people cannot avoid in their food, cooking with and consuming authentic (California sourced) extra virgin olive oil can help a great deal to block the chemical conversions.

People can also refine their cooking methods and use techniques that cook slowly and at lower temperatures in order to reduce the formation of AGE’s. These include cooking by crock pot, steaming, boiling, and by a technique called “sous vide” that can significantly lower inflammation from AGE exposure. Personally, my wife and I now cook almost all of our meat and vegetables in crockpots or by the “sous vide” method to lower our exposure to AGE’s.

Limiting the use of antibiotics and medical procedures to the minimum necessary will help reduce further worsening of intestinal bacteria disturbances. Bring common sense back into the equation and explore the least invasive or less potent option.

The questions to ask your physician is not can you have it, but should you have it, are there less invasive or disruptive alternatives, and will it make a meaningful difference for your health.

Seeking treatment for the overgrowth of intestinal bacteria can also go a long way towards lessening inflammaging. In some people, an OTC pre-biotic fiber called inulin that is found in many foods such as onions and garlic may help control the overgrowth, while others will require treatment with targeted short-term prescriptions.

 

Helping the Brain Control Inflammation

Inflammation is normally controlled by the Autonomic Nervous System and inflammaging is significantly worsened by autonomic dysfunction.

The Autonomic Nervous System is the brain’s master control mechanism and communicates with every organ in the body such as the heart, bladder, stomach, intestines and kidneys. It is how the brain regulates inflammation, the immune system, blood pressure, blood sugar, sleep cycles, and hormones.

The Autonomic Nervous System is composed of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches. These two opposite branches should work together in balance but people with unresolved autonomic injury very often have symptoms from both parasympathetic and sympathetic dysfunction.

The Autonomic Nervous Systems is increasingly prone to injury and dysfunction because of a wide-array of stressors such as poor nutrition, vegetable oils in our foods, childbirth, intestinal infections, metabolic or inflammatory events, medications, adverse or excessive reactions to vaccinations, and both physical and emotional concussions and traumas.

Information from the parasympathetic branch is carried through the vagus nerve and normally controls and maintains homeostasis of inflammation throughout our body.

When the parasympathetic branch is damaged and weakened, it is unable to fully control the immune system and leads to chronic inflammatory conditions, autoimmune disorders, chronic pain syndromes. Weakened parasympathetic function also results in abnormal motility of the intestinal tract causing heartburn, GERD, IBS, or constipation.

 

Lower Inflammation Improves Autonomic Function

The Autonomic Nervous System may be tested by several methods but some tests only produce a normal or an abnormal result and they are not able to be easily repeated to monitor whether treatment is resulting in renewed autonomic function.

I prefer two testing methods in combination. The first method is HRV testing which measures the influence of autonomic signals on the precise time interval between every pair of heartbeats. The second method is spectral analysis of the autonomic signaling to the heart.

Spectral analysis provides information about sympathetic and parasympathetic strength and balance, and can be easily repeated over time to monitor recovery of autonomic function.

When performed at rest, heart rate variability (HRV) is primarily a reflection of parasympathetic activity and will fluctuate based on the health of the parasympathetic branch.

Chronic inflammation results in a decline in parasympathetic function and HRV while the reduction in chronic inflammation improves HRV as well parasympathetic strength on spectral analysis.

Advanced autonomic dysfunction results in progressively lower and lower HRV. People may silently slip into very weak parasympathetic function and they will not even realize it. I have seen a number of patients who were young, athletic, ate “clean” diets, and considered themselves to be healthy with absolutely no idea that their parasympathetic brain function was damaged.

The weakest pattern of parasympathetic function is also referred to as Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) which has a 50% mortality rate in 5 years if it is left untreated. Fortunately, it can often be stabilized with medication and I have seen it reverse and recover even in elderly patients.

Although autonomic injuries and dysfunction seem to be becoming more common in the general population, they are easily detectable and fortunately autonomic dysfunction is now reversible or capable of improvement without long term medications.

 

Stimulating the Vagus Nerve to Lower Inflammation

A potent method to lowering chronic inflammation is to increase parasympathetic function by stimulating the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve carries information from the parasympathetic branch of the Autonomic Nervous System, and operates as the regulator of inflammation throughout the entire body in a process referred to as the vagus-inflammatory reflex.

The signal carried by the vagus nerve operates much like your foot on the brakes of your car. The stronger the parasympathetic impulse, the more inflammation slows and eventually comes to a stop.

Groundbreaking bioelectrical research is demonstrating that stimulation of the vagus nerve with a mild electrical current is capable of lowering inflammation throughout the body. In other words, electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve mimics the normal anti-inflammatory signal of parasympathetic autonomic branch.

The ability to lower inflammation via the vagus nerve is thought to be so important that it promises to make many medications obsolete in our lifetimes and it gives us a whole new understanding of stopping disease pathways.

Vagus nerve stimulation is doctor-prescribed medical treatment. Implanted devices to stimulate the vagus nerve have been performed in approximately 100,000 individuals over the last 20 years.

In order to avoid the risk and costs associated with surgery, I utilize a less invasive and less expensive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulator (tVNS). By applying a mild current to the skin just above a specific location at the ear where a branch of the vagus nerve is located, we are able to generate similar anti-inflammatory responses as the seen with the implantable device.

Vagus Nerve stimulation is a complex treatment method and different settings are used for different people depending on their individual health, and are used at varying lengths of time for different conditions. Vagus stimulation with electricity should not be tried without the guidance of experienced physician because permanent neurological injury may occur if the proper electrical settings are not used.

Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulator is an important tool for inflammation control and a core aspect of my multifaceted autonomic recovery program, The Nemechek Protocol™ for Autonomic Recovery (Patent Pending). The Nemechek ProtocolTM is capable of reversing chronic autonomic damage and symptoms even if they have persisted for decades.

It is also capable of eliminating some of the symptoms of other chronic inflammation disorders such as depression, PTSD, post-concussion syndrome, autoimmune disorders and even improve Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

I believe that the key to restoring our natural inflammation control mechanisms is through a reduction of inflammation throughout the brain and body by using every scientific, nutritional, and bioelectric tool available.

 

I am an internal medicine physician (D.O.) from UCLA and my Internal Medicine and Autonomic practice is in the Phoenix, Arizona area. For additional information, call my office 623-208-4226 or go to AutonomicMed.com.

This post is provided as an information resource only and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information is not intended to be patient education, and it does not create any patient-physician relationship.

© 2018. Nemechek Consultative Medicine. All Rights Reserved. Patent Pending.

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Jo Marshall
Jo Marshall

Hi Dr Nemechek
I am doing your protocol (41 yr old woman with chronic fatigue) and finished my first course of rifaximin 9 days ago. I felt good whilst on the Rifaximin but the day after finishing it, I ate something that I don’t normally have a reaction to (peanuts), my stomach inflamed and then I got a migraine which I still have 9 days on. I’m a little concerned – could it just be my body reacting to the drugs or trying to detox them?
Many thanks
Joanna marshall

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

You need to give you gut a little chance to rebalance beyond just 1 day.

I think the reaction you’re experiencing is from something other than the peanuts

ATA
ATA

Hi, Mr Nemecheck my daughter is 3.6 years old she was prefectly fine at the age of 2 years after that she started loosing speech and appear the sign of autism. would you plz help me in this regards

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Please read the book to understand what is wrong and what you can do about it.

A copy can be purchased at https://autonomicrecovery.shop

Sorted
Sorted

Hi Dr Nemechek,

May I ask why you think that the sous vide method is the best way for cooking? In our home, we do not use plastics at all. The thought of warming plastic even at a room temperature does not seem wise surely. This is sort of like plastic baby bottles and the sudden surge for bpa free plastics. Perhaps research has not caught up yet. Aren’t there other cooking methods Lehigh can be used and never to cook your food till burnt. Please advise your view for Iam really confused you this.

Thank you.

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I never said it was the best way to cook. It is just another method to cook things with lower AGE formation

Sorted
Sorted

I see. Thank you for the clarification. Noted.

sarah
sarah

Hi Dr. Nemechek. My daughter has a seizure disorder, she has had success with ketogenic diet therapy controlling it in The past but recently lost all control and remains on the diet. We are trying to tweak to see if we can regain control. We have started her on your protocol 1/4 tsp inulin, 1 tablespoon nordic naturals cod liver oil and she drinks the approved olive oil for her fat source throughout the day. She gets much more than the recommended dose. Since starting your protocol it seems that her seizures are increasing in frequency. My questions are: 1:… Read more »

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I do not believe the protocol elements would worsening her seizure frequency.

If LCKD isn’t controlling and meds have failed, you may want to consider the implanted VNS – much more effective treatment-resistant epilepsy.

Sarah
Sarah

Do you believe this protocol can “heal” seizures? Would she benefit from the tvns you prescribe? In this case would an implanted one work better? What are your success rates treating seizure conditions? I read the incredible one on the girl with Lennox gastaut. Gave me hope. Thank you for sharing your wisdom with the world

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

No it cannot heal seizures.

Implant devices are more effective for seizure management because the issue of compliance is eliminated.

Cwah
Cwah

Hi, Can you please clarify:
1. adults see more brain healing (per your comment above) on the rifaximin versus just inulin, and we should stop the inulin when we go on the rifaximin.
2. adults also need 3,000mg of DHA daily for brain healing per your comment above.
3. How long are you wanting adults on such high doses?

Thank you!
C

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

1. Yes
2. Correct
3. Indefinitely or else they relapse. Some advances (that are safe) might occur within the next 10 years that will allow a dosage reduction in DHA.

Dr Duci
Dr Duci

Hello Dr Nemechek.My child is 2y and 4 m.He doesn’t speak words or sentences but he has voice (bubling).Everything is checked and it is ok .We want to start using protocol and how long time we have to use it?

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Once your child recovers speech over the next 12-18 months, you’ll need to continue therapy for many years otherwise we believe some of the gains will be lost.

Raul Roman
Raul Roman

Have you tried with Enterogermina? I started with my son 2 years ago, before I read about NP, trying to improve his digestive system, and also some omega 3 thinking this could help, I saw similar results to the awakening we are having now with inulin and O3

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I strongly discourage the use of probiotics as they almost universally increase central nervous system inflammatory stress within my patients (this is stress is visible on autonomic testing as manifest by decreased HRV).

We have had several catastrophic events in my autistic and developmentally challenged children when given probiotics.

And finally, the idea that probiotics help us “rebuild our flora” is completely false scientifically and dangerous clinically.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Is it normal for a increase in inflammation after starting the protocol? After taking the oils in the morning a hour later I have a increase of inflammation in my hands. It goes away after about a hour. Other than this issue the protocol has helped me tremendously in my recovery of Lyme disease. Thank you Dr. Nemechek!!!

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

No not common at all.

I’d try shifting the oils to evening to see if the same reaction happens in the evening instead.

Zahra
Zahra

Hi

I am planning to start your protocol as I am planning to get pregnant. However, I am using optavia diet that has probiotic as one of the ingredients can I still follow your protocol. Also I will be starting with Rifaximin but after I finish the course do I still need to be started on Inulin. Please let me know.

Thank you

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I discuss my thoughts about prevention in my book.

Deanna Hamilton
Deanna Hamilton

Dr Nemechek if my husband is already being prescribed Epanova omegas for his cholesterol would those be acceptable to take in place of the omegas for the protocol?

He takes 2000mg daily. If not do we add the ones with the protocol or would that be too much?

Thank u for your help.

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Adults do not experience much autonomic recovery without 3000 mg of DHA. Thats the important thing to keep in mind.

Deborah
Deborah

Thank you so much for sharing your research with the world. It is changing my daughters life! She is 10, 1/8t inulin & on protocol 3 months. About 3 or 4 weeks ago when I thought we stopped seeing gains, I increased her NOW DNA from 2 capsules to 4 and the EVOO from 1T to 2T daily. As I was looking over the dosage chart today to start myself and my husband on the protocol, I realized I am giving her more than recommended. She is definitely having gains (ie., just today she completed all of her math worksheet… Read more »

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I see no harm in these doses. leave her where she is until our visit this Fall.

Renee
Renee

Hi Dr. Nemechek, thank you so much for sharing your protocol with the world; my daughter is thriving with a gene mutation, because of your protocol. Have you had anyone use it for Adrenoleukodystrophy or ALD? Many thanks.

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Not that I am aware of but the protocol has the ability to help reduce brain damaging inflammation and can potentially help a wide-range of neurological disorders.

Michael
Michael

For the last few years, I have been struggling with more and more health concerns with issues with abdominal bloating and internal fat, join pain, inflamation, nerve issues in my arms feet and hands. I feel like Im a pretty healthy 45 year old that eat pretty well (vegetarian with no dairy) When I saw your video, I’m really scared now. I think I may have Autonomic Dysfuntion of some sort and would like to understand how to start getting help to treat it. I live in portland Oregon.

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

You might review our book on autism. It covers all the mechanisms that are involved with causing autonomic dysfunction in the first place.

Most of my research has been involve in autonomic recovery in adults but because of my protocol’s success with autism, finishing the adult autonomic recovery book has been delayed until the fall of 2018.

You can get a copy at https://autonomicrecovery.shop or on Amazon.

Bhaveshkumar H Patel
Bhaveshkumar H Patel

Hi Dr.N,
My niece has been diagnosed with crohn about 6 months back and her blood test also shows cdiff. She is 12 yo old. Do you suggest being on protocol can help her or do we need anything else.

Regards,
PPatel

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I would look for the 2 studies showing the use of rifaximin for Crohn’s disease. A single 10-day course in these studies resulted in Crohn’s remission in 45-60%

Erik
Erik

Thanks Doc! One more quick question. What are your thoughts on this study comparing Xifaxan to herbal antibiotics? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24891990
The only reason I would ask, I live in Taiwan and they don’t import Rifaximin here. By the way, loved your book on Autism and now reading A Simplified Guide to Autonomic Dysfunction. Keep up the amazing work!

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I’ve had many patients who were unable to recover autonomic function when their SIBO was treated with the herbal combinations as compared to Rifaximin. All eventually required Rifaximin.

Erik
Erik

I’m putting my son on this protocol, he’s two, diagnosed with language delay, maybe signs of autism. My 4yo daughter could easily follow the program, too. She has asthma, bites her fingernails, could it possibly help her with that?

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Although I do not think it can help with asthma, the protocol is fundamentally very healthy and beneficial for the vast majority of children.

Carly
Carly

I found Nemechek Protocol while searching for more help for my youngest ASD son… but having read the book I have put our entire family of 7 on it! 🙂 I am curious if I personally will see any huge benefits as I had Ulcerative Colitis at 29yrs and by 34yrs had flares (after my second child) that no longer responded to the LONG list of drugs. I ended up having to have surgery to have my entire colon removed and then part of my small intestine was used to make an internal “pouch”. I know I have SIBO and… Read more »

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Your case is obviously complicated but patients of mine who have a colostomy after colectomy often have substantial improvements but generally needed repeated cycles of Xifaxan (every 2-3 months) to maintain their health.

Tina
Tina

I am wondering if you have used this protocol to help any patients recover from eczema? Also do you have patients restrict sugar in their diet?

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Yes, it can help greatly reduce eczema.

Mymy
Mymy

THANK YOU, KINDLY! After Rifiximin, If not inulin what to do to regrow the good bacteria in my gut? A recent stool test showed zero lactobacillus bacteria, low butyrate & low colostridia (the good kind). Is there a way to regrow them? As I’ve read, you said it’s not likely with food and no to probiotics which I can understand. I’m already on a no carb/sugar diet the rest of the month & have been for a month already. I’d like to regrow the good while preventing another sibo or h.pylori relapse, both of which were in me last yr.… Read more »

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Your good bacteria are present just in such small numbers as to not be readily detectable with culture testing.

Rebalancing with inulin or rifaximin will allow your remaining healthy bacteria to re-populate the small intestine in a healthier manner.

Unfortunately, we do not yet have the capability to replenish our intestines with missing bacteria.

Probiotics and fermented foods will not achieve will not lead to a healthier, natural blend of intestinal bacteria.

Mymy
Mymy

Hello there! I just got refaxamin for “sibo”. I haven’t started it yet. 1. Should we as adults take inulin WHILE on the refaxamin? Or do we wait until done with the refaxamin to start the inulin? I was also given 1 month of rantindadine for gerd & ulcer. I’m wanting to make sure it won’t relapse or make worse the sibo. 2. Ater refaxamin therapy is complete is staying away from inulin the best option to reduce sibo reoccurrence? 3. Is 2 weeks on refaxamin even enough? I used it last yr & symptoms didn’t improve even though the… Read more »

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I recommend my patients just stop the inulin once they start the rifaximin. Continuing inulin doesn’t seem to help prevent relapse and might cause some symptoms of bloating or flatulence.

Aisha
Aisha

I am using b12 shots,zinc for sensory issue and vitamin d(my son is insufficient),with your protocol may i continue these as well?

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I continue these if there is valid blood testing confirming the levels are low

Suzanne
Suzanne

Hello
I am in Australia and have been on the nemecheck protocol for 6 months. I didn’t really have any sibo issues. But suffer daily from headaches and muscle pain. Have been told possible fibromyalgia. My question is that I don’t want to start the rixamifan course . Happy to plod along with the inulin. But I am interested in the tvns . So what option is there for us Aussie’s who can’t consult with you??
Thankyou

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

Many people even adults recover without the VNS if they use rifaximin as part of the protocol.

Franklin Cardiovascular Associates
Franklin Cardiovascular Associates

This is really very informative and you are right consumption of vegetable oils, which are there every where, actually are one of the important causes of inflammation and severe inflammation must be taken seriously, it may bring bad news, if not taken care of on time.

Joan
Joan

Thank you for your reply, sorry i asked the question twice as i was unsure my first attempt was submitted correctly

Anonymous
Anonymous

I am going to try your protocol and have found a DHA supplement , and am looking for the olive oil. Both of these are more difficult to find in Canada.
I cannot get in to see my physician regarding Rifaxamin, would it be beneficial to start taking inulin while I wait to see him or should I just start with the oils ? I am an adult , and as I have read so far, I know you prefer the drug instead of inulin for adults.

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

The olive oil is readily available through Amazon.ca

Yes rifaximin is necessary for brain recovery but inulin can help somewhat.

But until you can get some, start the inulin along with the EVOO and DHA.

Fredrick
Fredrick

For those of us that have neuropathy with autonomic involvement who are unable to travel or afford your fees, is there a written list of things to do that we could download and follow that would correct this?

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

High DHA-concentration fish oil, olive oil and re-balance the intestinal tract.

Catherine Shortt
Catherine Shortt

I am in the same boat as Kristen with damage to my nervous system/vagus nerve due to medication side effects/ withdrawal. Your protocol has been shared in facebook communities helping people with this chronic condition. We are looking for a way back to health. We are caught between the medical system that prescribed these medications yet cannot deal with the consequences and a growing body of knowledge around trauma and healing the gut and vagus nerve. We are following your site with intense interest!

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

My protocol helps the nervous system recovery from a great variety of injuries – physical, emotional, inflammatory and metabolic.

Kristin
Kristin

I am hoping you can help me. I am wondering if you are familiar with benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome? There is a very large community of people that have been injured from stopping their benzodiazepine too quickly. I was prescribed a benzo for anxiety. I took it as directed for 6 years. When I decided I did not want to take it anymore my Dr. had me taper in 4 weeks. After the medicine left my body I became severely disabled. I believe the benzo damages the GABA receptors throughout the body. In a matter of days I went from normal… Read more »

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I’m sorry I am familiar with benzodiazepine withdrawal but not with the syndrome you speak of.

Leticia Odametey
Leticia Odametey

I have my son on Super Nu Thera with P-5-P and he was taking 4 tsp a day. When I decreased to 2 his stemming and negative behaviors came back after 3-4 days. So I increased to 3 and he was fine. Should I remove him being as though I’ve seen gains with him on it and negatives once the dose was lowered?

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

As a general rule, my patients recovery more rapidly and more consistently without supplements.

You need to read about what causing the increased stimming and hyperactivity at the beginning of the protocol.

Get a copy of the protocol at https://autonomicrecovery.shop

Amanda Proszek
Amanda Proszek

I have searched your site and was wondering if you consider “prenatal vitamins” to fall under the other supplements category and they cannot be used while on the protocol. OB’s are always so adamant about taking them and I don’t want to mess anything up on either front so I was wondering your take on them?

Patrick Nemechek, D.O.
Patrick Nemechek, D.O.

I routinely restrict supplements in the patients I treat.

I would be cautious about doing the protocol during pregnancy. I discuss prevention issues in my protocol guide.

You can get a copy at https://autonomicrecovery.shop

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